You are here

Research Highlights

Research Highlights

 

2nd Annual Research Uncorked

 

 

The Second Research Uncorked was held on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 from 3 PM to 5 PM in the gym.  Faculty and students had an opportunity to meet and network with colleagues to discuss research interests. Research posters from current projects were available for viewing. The  goal of the event was to foster new collaborations and scholarly activity.

 

Making a Difference: SPH Researchers in the News

 

June 2018

Dr. Robert Cohen, clinical professor of environmental and occupational health sciences in the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, is quoted in an NPR article about a review by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine published today that states that current protective measures do not do enough to protect miners from mining-related dust that contributes to lung disease. The report suggested that even under stricter regulations imposed in 2016, dust readings may still be inadequate. "We still have to sample more people and we have to sample them more frequently," said Cohen, who reviewed the report. (Article: https://n.pr/2IBzjfl)

(Source: Sharon Parmet, Director of Health Sciences and Research Communications Office of Public & Government Affairs)

 

Dr. Gary Slutkin, professor of professor of global health and epidemiology in the UIC School of Public Health and founder of Cure Violence, was interviewed by the Washington Post on treating violent crime like an infectious disease. (article:  https://wapo.st/2t52H92

(Source: Sharon Parmet, Director of Health Sciences and Research Communications Office of Public & Government Affairs)

HealthDay News covered new research out of the UIC School of Public Health that found that the incidence of progressive massive fibrosis - a severe form of black lung disease - has been on the rise among coal workers. Lead researcher Kirstin Almberg, assistant professor of occupational and environmental health sciences in the UIC School of Public Health, and colleagues discovered the trend when they analyzed U.S. Department of Labor data on former coal miners who applied for benefits from the Federal Black Lung Program between its start in 1970 and 2016.

"We were, however, surprised by the magnitude of the problem and are astounded by the fact that this disease appears to be resurging despite modern dust control regulations," Almberg said. "This is history going in the wrong direction." (Article: https://bit.ly/2IKtgtS)

(Source: Sharon Parmet, Director of Health Sciences and Research Communications Office of Public & Government Affairs)

 

Like us on Facebook!